Tourism in Kazan

Kazan

Kazan City excursion, duration – 3-4 hours. By car – from 48 USD.

 

Kazan Kremlin

The Kazan Kremlin is a World Heritage Site.
The Kazan Kremlin is the symbol of the city, the heart of the Kazan tourism and an architectural conservation area on the UNESCO World Heritage List. It was built in the 16th century on the ruins of Tatar khan’s fortress.

Söyembikä Tower

Söyembikä Tower, also called the Khan's Mosque
Söyembikä Tower, also called the Khan’s Mosque, is probably the most familiar landmark and architectural symbol of Kazan.

The tower’s construction date is enshrouded in mystery. Several scholars date its construction to the turn of the 17th and 18th centuries, when tiered towers were exceedingly popular in Russia, but others date the tower to the 16th century, probably before 1552.

Qol Şärif Mosque

The Qolşärif Mosque, also spelled Qol Sharif, Qol Sherif and Kol Sharif via the Tatar Qol Şärif mäçete, Qolşärif mäçete

The Qolşärif Mosque, also spelled Qol Sharif, Qol Sherif and Kol Sharif via the Tatar Qol Şärif mäçete, Qolşärif mäçete) located in Kazan Kremlin, was reputed to be – at the time of its construction – one of the largest mosques in Russia, and in Europe outside of Istanbul

Originally, the mosque was built in the Kazan Kremlin in the 16th century. It was named after Qolşärif, who served there. Qolşärif died with his numerous students while defending Kazan from Russian forces in 1552. It is believed that the building featured minarets, both in the form of cupolas and tents. Its design was traditional for Volga Bulgaria, although elements of early Renaissance and Ottoman architecture could have been used as well. In 1552, during the storming of Kazan it was destroyed by Ivan The Terrible.

Since 1996, the mosque has been rebuilt in Kazan Kremlin, although its look is decisively modern. Its inauguration on July 24, 2005, marked the beginning of celebrations dedicated to the Millennium of Kazan. It can accommodate 6,000 worshipers.